Pacific Media Centre Pacific Media Watch Pacific Journalism Review Pacific Scoop

Intentional use of te reo Māori in New Zealand newspapers in 2007

Volume 15, Issue 2

October, 2009

From page
174
to page
190
Rankine, J., Barnes, M.A., Borell, B., Kaiwai, H., Nairn, R., McCreanor, T., & Gregory, A. (2009). International use of te reo Māori in New Zealand newspapers in 2007. Pacific Journalism Review, 15(2): 174-190.
Author(s): Angela Moewaka Barnes, Belinda Borell, Amanda Gregory, Hector Kaiwai, Tim McCreanor, Raymond Nairn
Publication date: 
October, 2009

The study aimed to measure the intentional use of words in te reo Māori in a representative sample of newspaper news items about Māori issues.While te reo Māori was made an official language in 1987, it remains endangered and New Zealand remains one of the most monolingual countries in the world. The news items analysed were about Māori issues, and thus more likely to include Māori words. Only words with an alternative in English were counted, and the origin of articles was analysed. Forty-five percent of items included no Māori words. Only words with an alternative in English were counted, and the origin of articles was analysed. forty-five percent of items included no Māori words with an alternative in English, and the average across the sample was 2.4. More than half the Māori words counted described social culture. Use of te reo varied widely among newspapers. No regular Māori language promotion items appeared in the sample, and it provides little evidence of support for New Zealand's endangered indigenous official language.