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This article evaluates Fiji’s Media Industry Development Decree 2010 by drawing a link between it and the Singaporean media laws and the collaborative role the Fijian regime claims journalism should play in the nation’s development. A number of...
Commentary: While the media has demonstrated that it can cover global and governance issues, it neglects the potential to be a responsible partner, especially in developing countries such as Papua New Guinea and to an extent the Pacific. However,...
Evidence is produced that Bhutanese citizens are adopting many of the media and communication technologies and practices common in more developed countries, and that the government has the political will to encourage this with infrastructure...
While there is a need to challenge mainstream media to improve their portrayal of women in contemporary Pacific society, there is also a need to counter factors affecting and inhibiting women’s engagement with that media. This not only requires the...
It was dubbed Black Tuesday - the night four people were shot dead during protests against World Bank structural adjustment policies in Papua New Guinea. The University of PNG journalism newspaper Uni Tavur published a special edition on 30 July...
Mass media in the Asia-Pacific region need to reexamine their old habits, beliefs and practices and ask: are we meeting the demands of the changing times? Or are we still capable of accommodating these changes? If not, what do we need to do?
In May 1995, one of the Pacific's best known newspapers closed. A regional magazine summed up The Times of Papua New Guinea thus: Strength: the diversity of views and efforts to cover national life fully. Weakness: Loss of skilled journalists that...
Events in recent years in the South Pacific have dispelled hitherto widely held perceptions of the region as a peacefully modernising backwater of traditional societies. In particular, the 1987 coups in Fiji galvanised the attention of politicians...
Papua New Guineans would not be impressed by fancy arguments advanced elsewhere —that it is immoral to copy somebody else's work and that a country should adopt copyright laws to enhance its international standing.
Abstract: The new National Information and Communication Policy (NICP) highlights contradictions and dilemmas for the Papua New Guinean media. How closely was the media consulted in the drafting of this policy?

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