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health reporting

Fighting to Choose is a fascinating, meticulously researched history of the struggle to liberalise New Zealand’s abortion laws. It examines why there is still no right to have an abortion in a progressive country like New Zealand, which has a strong...
Research on the effects of medical news stories on the public has demonstrated that consumers make decisions about personal health care options and choices sometimes exclusively based on stories published by the media. Given the news media’s ability...
Mental illness, its terminologies, definitions, voluntary and compulsory treatment regimes, and its interface with the criminal justice system are defined and regulated remarkably differently across the 10 Australian and New Zealand jurisdictions....
This article presents the findings from a longitudinal content analysis on the reporting of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) in Papua New Guinea’s two national newspapers—The National and Post-Courier—in 2000, 2005 and 2010. The authors tried to...
This article reports on the research and analysis of editorial attitudes and news reporting in two prominent Sydney newspapers—The Daily Telegraph (DT) and The Sydney Morning Herald (SMH)—about the establishment and operation of the Medically...
The booklet, published by the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) and sponsored by the Swedish Trade Union movement, is divided into three parts: the basics, the media and more about HIV. It provides answers to frequently asked questions...
An analysis of political statements, government reports, scientific debate and the remarks of international health officials on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Papua New Guinea. This commentary to a grim future unless decisive strategies are implemented. 
In 1999, the author conducted face-to-face interviews with 25 newspaper editors from several South Pacific countries. The findings highlighted a worrying sense of complacency and lack of knowledge about HIV/AIDS among the editors. Moreover, most of...
Heart disease, turberculosis, STDs and HIV/AIDS have one common feature: they are, with the correct information and application, all preventable diseases. Yet, throughout the Pacific, such diseases are on the increase. What should the media do?
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