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Much Indigenous affairs journalism in the Western Australian state capital of Perth reproduces colonial discourse and perpetuates racist stereotypes of Aboriginal people. Against this background the traditional custodians of Perth, the Noongar...
The colonisation of the Hawai’ian people is a story shared with Māori and other Polynesian peoples. It is a story of shame, desecration, loss of land and loss of life. The commonality of the historical Pacific experience, however, can too easily...
South Pacific media face a challenge of developing forms of journalism that contribute to the national ethos by mobilising change from passive communities to those seeking change. Instead of the news values that have often led international media to...
Commentary: François Hollande’s five-year term of office as President of France overlaps a critical time for the future of New Caledonia, where a referendum is set to take place between 2014 and 2019 to decide whether or not the archipelago will...
For more than two decades, diversity has been a growing mantra for the New Zealand news media. Initially, the concept of biculturalism—partnership with the indigenous tangata whenua—was pre-eminent in the debate, but as the nation’s Pasifika and...
This article explores the social significance of increased media production by Maori in Aotearoa/New Zealand as an opportunity for challenging a tendency in mainstream journalism to promote Pakeha perspectives. The analysis focuses on the recent...
Mo ratou, ma matou, ma koutou, ma tatou For them, for us, for everyone As the Māori Television Service (MTS) celebrates its first year on air, it is easy to forget the long and at times painful struggle to get there, the aspirations of those who...
Darwin has the largest Aboriginal population of any Australian city at nearly nine per cent, and the Northern Territory has nearly 28 per cent of the indigenous population. While the greater majority of the indigenous population in Darwin lives in...
Tom O'Regan and Philip Batty in Australian Television Culture, identify a problematic confrontation between westernised concepts of 'publicness' and the notions of that 'publicness' found within Aboriginal cultural practices. O'Regan and Batty...
This article considers TVNZ's audience discussion programme, State of the Nation, as a moment of public sphere discourse. The programme's pre-broadcast branding and deliberate construction of a bicultural television space is examined, while...

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