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An ABC Four Corners team investigates allegations about the role of the International Red Cross and the British military in a massacre in the Southern Highlands of Irian Jaya during May 1996. The story of what happened has never been told before....
'Journalism in East Timor now, in the absence of oppression and repression, calls for a new way of looking at things and a new way of writing. But because it is more difficult to do, our journalists need better training. We must be honest, fair,...
Knightley's book is self critical, especially about the value of his writing on the intelligence service during the Cold War and he refers to himself as "the world's worst war correspondent" for assuring his editor at the Sunday Times that there...
Discovering the "facts"— and the truth— means jouranlists must push, probe, pry, unsettle, expose, inform, and report ... and pass judgement on others. But beware of these risks. 
In early 1996, a PNG news media cover-up was alleged over the so-called Topul Rali affair. An exposé by the student newspaper Uni Tavur led to a clash with the University of PNG administration and the journalism programme was closed down three years...
Editors and news directors decided the controversial restructuring of operations at the University of Papua New Guinea was the story deserving deeper exploration. By week's end, journalists had produced a series of feature and news stories for media...
The University of PNG's journalism program has performed with distinction since it began in 1975 with New Zealand Government aid funding the staff and courses for about three years. More than 170 students have graduated with degrees or diplomas in...
One of the basic roles of journalism is to inform people about what is happening. Technically, we describe this as the 'watchdog' role. But in Papua New Guinea the 'watchdog' has dangerously dosed off on the AIDS situation. 
The 'winebox inquiry' has been described as the Cook Islands and New Zealand's Watergate, but you wouldn't know it from the news media attention being paid it. 
Once seeking to be a biochemist, Dominic Kakas decided to commit himself to journalism. Fired by a strong desire to make a difference with Papua New Guinea's growing corruption problem, he is now editor of The Independent.

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