Pacific Media Centre Pacific Media Watch Pacific Journalism Review Pacific Scoop

media ethics

Pages

As many readers will know, Pacific Journalism Review was published for nine years in the Pacific – initially at the University of Papua New Guinea from November 1994, and then most recently at the University of the South Pacific in Fiji. This issue...
In spite of the hot air about governments pressuring the media in Pacific countries—and this does happen all too frequently—I believe a greater threat to press freedom comes from a small clique of media veterans, many of whom are of palagi origin,...
Both the Fiji Times and the Daily Post reinforced the colonial myth that Fijian chiefs are the rightful rulers of Fiji, emphasising that Fiji, and this presumably means Fijians, was not ready for a multiracial constitution.
The context of an election makes little difference to the way the journalist practises his or her profession. The basics are all the same. We do not adopt a different set of values because a group of politicians are vying for power. 
Poolside rumours at the Centra and the media peddling of them had much to answer for in foreign coverage of the Fiji coup. One reporter was an extreme example of the Stockholm Syndrome but others who remained in Parliament day after day also quickly...
The booklet has two sections, one briefly devoted to the Divine Word University Media Freedom Day on 30 April 1999, and the main one which collects papers and speeches at the Media Ethics workshop organised by the PNG Media Council and sponsored by...
In a long-running Government dispute with the Fiji news media over professionalism, accountability and training ever since the May 1999 general election, this speech stirred the controversy to new heights. 
In March 1995, the United States government issued a patent on a human cell line for an indigenous Hagahai man from the rainforests of Papua New Guinea. The US National Institutes of Health (NIH) were issued patent No. 5,397,696 by the Patent and...
Assaults, arbitrary imprisonment, gaggings, threats and defamation cases have become an increasing hazard for Pacific journalists. And they also face mounting pressure from governments to be accountable and to report the truth. But the issue is...
Papua New Guineans would not be impressed by fancy arguments advanced elsewhere —that it is immoral to copy somebody else's work and that a country should adopt copyright laws to enhance its international standing.

Pages

Subscribe to media ethics