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"Just how many surveys of the world press freedom do we need? One view is that there can never be enough because, every time Freedom House, Reporters San Frontiéres, the International Federation of Journalists or the Committee to Protect Journalists...
For more than 50 years, the governments of Kiribati have manipulated the affairs of the Broadcasting and Publications Authority (BPA). The authority runs a radio station and newspaper reaching the majority of the population of Kiribati. The...
When Phillip Knightley was researching The First Casualty (1975), controversial fellow Australian journalist Wilfred Burchett was at the top of his list of war correspondents in the Pacific theatre whom he needed to interview. But he was at a loss...
This article looks at three South Pacific Island nations—Fiji, Tonga and the Solomon Islands—in terms of some landmark changes occurring in their political arenas.  Fiji, beset by racial and political problems culminating in three coups, is...
The sole aim of media is to make as much money as they can. Or again, the media are to serve only the people in power, political or economic. If you agree to that, you might as well stop reading this. This issue of Pacific Journalism Review is...
The news media in Oceania are small but remarkably diverse and vigorous. Ownership ranges from large transnational corporations and robust local media companies, as in Fiji and Papua New Guinea, to local entrepreneurial and Government media...
On 11 August 2003, after producing some 1600 cartoons, Malcolm Evans was controversially dismissed from his position as editorial cartoonist at The New Zealand Herald because he had refused to accept that the editor had the right to dictate the...
Justice Ian Callinan, appointed to the Autralian High Court in 1998, challenged the rhetoric on the media's role in society and its claims to press freedom with his minority decision in the Lenah Game Meats case in 2001. He questioned the notion of...
Censorship can backfire because it is usually viewed as a violation of the right to free expression, which is widely valued as an ideal; under the Charter of the United Nations, freedom of expression is a universal human right. Backfire occurs, for...
This special edition of Pacific Journalism Review publishes a selection of the papers presented at the Public Right to Know (PR2K) Conference in Sydney in October 2003. The annual PR2K conferences are a project of the Australian Centre for...

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