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media responsibility

In Fiji, too much damage had been done by tendentious propaganda by a few that had frayed the fabric of the Fijian society at so many levels of social harmony and political growth of a young democratic nation. And once a nation (and a person)...
A discussion paper released by the New Zealand Law Commission just before the end of 2011 looked into how well the regulatory framework governing the NZ media was working, and concluded that change was needed. Currently complaints must be made first...
Two months after ‘liberating’ Iraq, the Anglo-American authorities in Baghdad decided to control the new and free Iraqi press. Newspapers that publish ‘wild stories’, material deemed provocative or capable of inciting ethnic violence, are being...
If a serious commitment were made to produce a quality Fijian daily, I don't doubt that it would soon outsell all the English ones. Next time anyone in the Fiji media suggests that a major problem today is that the Fijian people are so ill-informed...
In a long-running Government dispute with the Fiji news media over professionalism, accountability and training ever since the May 1999 general election, this speech stirred the controversy to new heights. 
A look at the reporting of general elections from the perspective of the Australian Press Council presented at the University of the South Pacific with an eye to the Fiji election in may 1999. 
Try to understand the source of the story, the channel, the program, even the presenter. Presenters become credible because of their record of telling the truth, being transparent, that's what gets them their viewers and keeps them. The truth...
During the elections the news media, both as a corporate citizen and as the conveyor of events, happenings and decisions to the masses, is called upon to exercise more care and responsibility than at any other time. An innocent looking news article...
The push by the PNG government for a 'responsible and accountable' media has put the country's industry in the public spotlight. Several seminars and debates have highlighted the role as a public watchdog. 
Image-massagers sprucing up Pacific government images aren't enough. While issues such as the raskol problem, land disputes and Bougainville remain unresolved, there will continue to be a 'bad press'.
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